Four Sixteenths In 5/8

A double kick lesson using groups of four sixteenth notes to create some interesting 5/8 grooves.

For this lesson you will be using groups of four 16th notes starting at various points in the bar. You will be using two feet for these grooves and pushing the tempo a little higher to make some cool sound patterns that would fit nicely in a hard rock or metal piece.

To familiarize you with how the sixteenth notes work I'll start by reminding you of a quick exercise. In this exercise you will play two eighth note bass drums in the first half of the bar. For the second half of the bar you will be four sixteenth notes using both feet. In both halves of the bar the right foot is playing on the numbered count and the '+' count, the left foot adds the 'e' and 'a' counts. The exercise is shown below with bar eighth and quarter notes on the right hand:

An exercise

Spend some time getting comfortable with the exercise and how the left foot is used to fill in the notes between the eighth notes. As usual, start with a low tempo but build up to a higher tempo than you would normally, around 160bpm would be good. To create the 5/8 version you just cut three eighth notes off the end of the bar.


Example 1

Sixteenth notes at the start of the bar with a simple feel.

Four double kick sixteenths in 5/8.


Example 2

Sixteenth notes at the start of the bar with a compound feel.

Four double kick sixteenths in 5/8.


Example 3

A variation on the simple groove.

Four double kick sixteenths in 5/8.


Example 4

A variation on the compound groove.

Four double kick sixteenths in 5/8.


Example 5

Starting on the second eighth note in with a simple feel.

Four double kick sixteenths in 5/8.


Example 6

Starting on the second eighth note in with a compound feel.

Four double kick sixteenths in 5/8.


Example 7

Sixteenth notes at the end of the bar with a simple feel.

Four double kick sixteenths in 5/8.


Example 8

Sixteenth notes at the end of the bar with a compound feel.

Four double kick sixteenths in 5/8.


TASK

  • Using the 2 minute rule, get all grooves up to a tempo of at least 160bpm.
  • Create further variations on these grooves.
  • Apply these grooves to a phrased piece.